Brooklyn’s Prospect Park was my training ground. As the miles added up to hours, I abandoned music for podcasts, and my running days began to take shape around the stories of others’ lives. When David Rakoff read, weeks before his death at 43, an excerpt from his final, unpublished manuscript, I retreated under the shade of an elm to cry quietly. When a black home health aide described noticing a white hooded gown hanging on the door of her dying client, I realized I’ve slowed down to gasp. (She stayed by his side until the end.) When a reporter, interviewing an evangelist politician, asked the state legislator if Jesus would have voted for the bill the legislator had introduced and he answered, after a long pause, “Probably not,” I yelled “Holy shit!” at a kid on a bike.
We made a cameo in this awesome piece about the New York marathon and Hurricane Sandy in The Atlantic.
This week’s podcast: A woman boards a plane for Brunei in search of a modern day fairy tale.
[Link]

This week’s podcast: A woman boards a plane for Brunei in search of a modern day fairy tale.

[Link]

The number one quality of great storytellers is their willingness to be vulnerable, their ability to tell on themselves.
Catherine Burns, The Moth: 50 True Stories
And I remember that back then, even though I did not know it, something told me that words had power. That words can save you. And the word that I learned was AIMLESSLY. Because I would call and say, “Lady, I think we found your dog, he was walking AIMLESSLY in Central Park.”

This week’s video: While doing research for a book, a young writer (Starlee Kine) finds herself getting sucked into a cult. 

And wouldn’t we want the person who tells our story be somebody who understand who we are?
Craig Chester
Telling a story tonight? The rules and guidelines at The Moth StorySLAM.

What we don’t want:
Stand-up routines. Rants. Essays. How-tos. Confessions. Lectures. Fictions. Gratuitous anything.
What we do want:
Hook us in. Make us care about you. Paint the scene. Clearly state your fears, desires, the dilemma. Make us invested in the outcome. Introduce the conflict. Make us worried for you. Impress us with observations that are uniquely yours. Rope us into the moment when it all goes down. Conclude as a different person: triumphant? Defeated? Befuddled? Enlightened? …CHANGED.

Kind of applies to all sorts of storytelling, right?

Telling a story tonight? The rules and guidelines at The Moth StorySLAM.

What we don’t want:

Stand-up routines. Rants. Essays. How-tos. Confessions. Lectures. Fictions. Gratuitous anything.

What we do want:

Hook us in. Make us care about you. Paint the scene. Clearly state your fears, desires, the dilemma. Make us invested in the outcome. Introduce the conflict. Make us worried for you. Impress us with observations that are uniquely yours. Rope us into the moment when it all goes down. Conclude as a different person: triumphant? Defeated? Befuddled? Enlightened? …CHANGED.

Kind of applies to all sorts of storytelling, right?

rachelfershleiser:

strandbooks:

Whenever I find a note or a photograph pressed between the pages of a book, I always find myself inventing a story to go along with it. Now is your chance to make that story up.

Submit an original piece of writing inspired by one of the Tumblr posts, and you could win a $50 Strand gift card!

What a cool writing contest! Do it, you guys!

Attention storytellers!

peter5tewart:

Kurt Vonnegut on the principles of storytelling. Brilliant.

What can we say - the man knows stories.